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The Wildlife Watch Binocular Summer 2005 Issue

The Wildlife Watch Hotline

877-WILD-HELP
( 877-945-3435 )

By Anne Muller

Wildlife Watch maintains a “hotline” in two phone directories, and every spring, we receive numerous panicky calls about fawns. The advice we give is leave fawns where they are provided they’re in a safe location. Although fawns may appear to be abandoned, the mom will come about twice a day to nurse, usually when no one is around and usually when it’s dark. If the fawn seems comfortable and healthy, chances are s/he’s getting her nourishment.

Try to locate a fawn rehabber near you for those rare times when the mother has been killed. For first aid tips, please see the link at our website – “Feeding Orphaned and Injured Wildlife.” Never give a fawn cow’s milk which can cause severe diarrhea.


CORRECTION: 

The printed version of The Wildlife Watch Binocular incorrectly listed the Hotline number as 866-WILD-HELP -- the correct prefix is 877.


We were gratified by the following letter that came by e-mail:

Dear Anne,

We followed your advice about leaving the baby alone!!!  We did a lot of watching ... The fawn was right in front of our home under a tree and near the rocks in the photo.

fawn watching
Fawn watching and being watched.
Photo by Michele H

He stayed with us for about 2 days, and we were so worried.. but we hoped that the mom was coming by at night or when we were not around. We never did get to see her. A male deer was feeding by the fawn and didn’t even know he was there. When he discovered the baby he jumped!! (the male jumped not the baby) It was so funny. He sniffed around for a quick minute and went back to feeding. We were going to give it one more day and then call you back but he left in the late afternoon...hopefully with his mom. We did see a mom one day later with 2 babies, hopefully one of them was our little guest.

Thanks for the advice.

Michele M

Valley Cottage, New York

 

1-877–WILD HELP
Please call if:

  • YOU ARE A WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR
    We’ll post your information, related events, or presentations plus we may do a story about you. Email photos and stories.

  • YOU NEED TO CONTACT A REHABBER
    IN THE NY LOWER OR MID HUDSON VALLEY AREA.

  • YOU WILL VOLUNTEER TO TRANSPORT
    INJURED OR ORPHANCED WILDLIFE TO REHABILITATORS.

 

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